Jim Henman; Co- Founder of April Wine Part Two

Mr. Henman – and that IS MR. Henman, recently toured for the first time in a long time …

Along the way, he played with his cousin David and hooked up with Myles Goodwyn for a listen to Myles’ soon-to-be-released C.D.

It has been a long journey for Jim, a musical man whose knowledge and love of ‘old school music’ – just may make the co-founder of April Wine, famous once more ….

Jim? What do you say …

Jim Henman – Co-Founder of April Wine. Part One

Jim Henman is very happy with the way his life turned out …

Considering some people would have regrets for leaving a rock band that would go on to become one of Canada’s largest, Mr. Henman went on to a very productive life with nothing but feelings of pride for his old mate; Myles Goodwyn.

A life that is more productive than ever. Musically and movie-wise. Say what?

Jim … Take it away …

Please visit Jim’s Site Here!

Jim Henman Still Has That ‘Same Old Feeling ‘ …

It has been a long time since Jim Henman recruited Myles Goodwyn to play in a band which became known as April Wine

new_cover_All these years later, Mr. Henman – a pioneer in Canadian music, has a new album and it is a return to his roots. All the music he loved growing up – returns to haunt the musician along with his many fans. Thank the Lord – Henman has a great memory.

The Singing Brakeman”, Jimmie Rodgers and ragtime guitarist/singer Blind Blake layered the roots for Jim Henman.

‘Same Old Feeling’ was released in 2012. A  collection of his many loves. It is a treasure of tunes which makes every listener  feel at home …

Track One; ‘ Slow Down’ – is a song Jim loved as a kid but always enjoyed playing more as  a country blues tune. Originally written by Larry Williams and recorded by The Beatles among many others, the opening chords of Jim’s version, all of three seconds, proves Henman is a likeable fellow. This song and this type of music can do that to a fellow or woman. The chorus sets the hay straight in the back of the truck and Henman, as the driver, ensures just the proper amount of bumps are hit at the beginning of this joyous ride. Country blues are not meant to sound smooth – live or recorded. Henman’s lifetime experience is aware and delivers it on cue.

‘You Can Have My Heart‘ – the second song, delivers Henman’s heart right on a golden platter via Hank Williams. “This is my Hank song.” says Henman. “Not to sound vain but I can picture Hank singing this.”

The song is a gentle introduction to Henman’s songwriting prowess that commenced along with Myles Goodwyn’s back in the mid – sixties with Woodie’s Termites. “It feels good and it’s a true story for me.” Admits Henman. In this day and age where television shows, movies and music seem to pump out hatred by the minute, it is easy to forget that great songs contain stories. Great songs contain melodies which provoke whistling. This Henman gem does just that …

The title track; ‘Same Old Feeling’ is a remarkable song and a play on words … or feelings. Henman has carried this song with him for forty years. He started writing it in a cottage, completed the process many years later in a cottage and guess what? The song is about a cottage … go figure? Henman finds the finished product happy and laid – back. He had a good time writing it and hopes a listener will as well. No doubt as once more Jim provides comfort. Jim enables us to ‘walk in the warm, warm rain’ and not get wet.

‘Could be Heaven’ – according to David and Ritchie Henman’s cousin – brings out his ‘old rock n roll’ self. Written in ten minutes – Jim loves the solo and the end of the song which bookends the fifties – style guitar riff to start the song. Reminiscent of  old April Wine songs … Coincidence? Nothing complicated – just old-time rock n roll. The kind of stuff that got the Silver Beatles hoppin’!

‘Thats The Way It Goes’ is a tune about a beach.  A sandy piece of land which is close to where Henman resides. Martinique  is the name of the beach and ‘Baboo’ is the name of the cat. A combination which makes a great tune.   A tasteful, delightful romp led by John Appleby’s mandolin playing and followed by Jim’s next – door – neighbor – style vocals. Great songs lead to whistling. This song includes whistling. A great song to listen to by the water while your feet dangle in nostalgia.

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Ritchie, David and Jim Henman

‘That’s All I Got’ is Jim Henman’s autobiographical song. It is important to listen to the words on this song which could have been easily recorded by The Band. It reels the details of Henman’s rise to fame with April Wine and his ‘would be ‘ demise if he had stuck around to watch it destroy him. A musical sense throughout the song dictates happiness yet a skylight remains open for a feeling of doom to chase the Halifax native along.

‘Walk Right In’
“It feels like this song has always been in my head.” says Henman of the Gus Cannon tune “I have played it for years at home .. I like this feel and what Charlie Phillips did in the solos … Love it! Chuck Buckett on drums really did it for me when he added his  drum ideas!”

‘I Don’t Have No Blues’ was written 15 years ago by Henman and wrote itself according to Jim. His appreciation of John Sebastian‘s songwriting comes out in this tune. Jim is telling us “I don’t have no blues’ and we kinda believe him. “It’s a blues tune that is not a blues tune ..” Says Henman. Whatever it is – it is a toe tapping acoustic number ripe with a century of artists’ souls and acoustic playing which gently stokes a flame long ago extinguished by hip hop and rap.

The last track is not final.

‘Shame Shame Boogie’ is a fictitious song about a guy in Waverly where Jim lived as a teen. A small town story and a tale which could be about ‘many people’ concludes Henman. The club they ( many people) went to was named Creeque Alley in Dartmouth, N.S . “For anyone who knows what I mean by Shame Shame Boogie …. they get it!” Adds Jim. ” The audience loved to sing along with the chorus .. I love it when that happens!’

Henman is doing a full band version of this song with a certain Myles Goodwyn on electric guitar. It will be released as a single. It is due out in a few months.

Hmmm … Myles and Henman playing together once again! I bet they get that “Same old feeling!’

http://jimhenman.com/

©rickkeene

All the Young Dudes; Part Two

‘All the Young Dudes’ are a perfect example of what can happen when art and business meet. The right and left sides of the brain are in those positions for a reason …

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Henman

Wayne Cullen, one of the two drummers in the band, reminisces on what a drag the whole ordeal became;

“There were enough completed, fully-produced tracks for a second album.” Explains Cullen.” Columbia decided not to release another lp rather than spend more money promoting the band any further. This was a shame because the band was very happy with the work we had done for the second album.”

The band had produced six of the tracks on their own and another five tracks had been produced by the well-known production team of Ron and Howie Albert. Two brothers who had been engineers at Criterion Studios in Miami under the tutelage of Tom Dowd and Karl Richardson.

The siblings had participated in the recording of the Derek and the Dominoes’ song Layla as well as recordings by Stephen Stills, the Allman Brothers and others.

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Segarini

“The brothers were asked by Columbia to supervise the production of some tracks for us after Columbia decided the six we had produced ourselves were inadequate.” Says Cullen. “When the Albert Brothers listened to the same six tracks they wondered aloud why they were asked to preside. They believed the self-produced tracks were excellent and they doubted they would be able to improve on what they had heard.”

Despite Columbia not knowing what was right, the ‘Dudes’ gave their all and have nothing but fond memories of the time spent together. According to David Henman, most of the funny memories took.place on stage …

“The band was quite spontaneous. In the middle of a set, Segarini would suddenly request that a table and six chairs be brought on stage so we could just sit, drink and goof around. Sometimes, when we used to perform downtown Montreal at the Moustache club, the next days’ newspaper would often arrive. Segarini would aks for it to be brought to the stage, whereupon he would put his own spin on the stories”. Laughs Henman.

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The Bee Gees

One tale which Segarini or anyone else do not have to conjur was meeting and hanging out with the Bee Gees. A memory which floats dearly in Henman’s conscience.

“I was very sick during the Bee Gees tour.” Says David. ” Somehow, I always ended up in Barry Gibb’s hotel suite after the show sitting between him and his wife and passing out on his shoulder. We were fans before the tour and by the end, we practically idolized them. Barry, especially – one of the most down to earth people I’ve ever met. The effect they had on audiences was pure magic.”

David did not stay in contact with all the Bee Gees. Barry did invite him to le Studio in Morin Heights when he was recording the album “Nights on Broadway”.

Says Henman. “I sat with him at the console while he chain-smoked Panama Red and conducted a string section. He then went into the studio and without any warm up – sang like an angel.”

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Ian Hunter

Henman and his fellow ‘dudes’ also met Ian Hunter. David became acquaintances with the singer and an opportunity to replace future Bowie guitarist Mick Ronson in Hunter’s band presented itself. Unfortunately, Henman was too shy to grab the opportunity.

Following the release of their first album, ‘the dudes’ thought about re – recording their first record.. A record which had and continued to have so much promise.

“Bob was on the phone constantly”.Says Henman. “Demanding that we be able to at least re-mix that album. If I am not mistaken, the guys at le Studio in Morin Heights offered to re-mix it for free.” He continues. “I think at least one other studio in Montreal made that offer as well but we were up against Columbia Records, a gigantic corporation at that time. We were told: “hey, Columbia Records insists that this album is going to be a huge hit and, well, they oughta know…” so, we backed down…”

Henman’s advice to young musicians and the lessons learned;

” If you are the artist, you should make the rules…”

Please stay tuned for more on ‘ the Dudes’..

All the Young Dudes; Part One

Mott the Hoople ain’t got nothing on these dudes …

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Okay, maybe they do.

Ian Hunter’s band, Mott the Hoople, were pretty much on the verge of nothing when David Bowie rescued them from the top of the nightclub heap. Bowie presented the band a gift. A song which was called ‘All the Young Dudes’. A record which Bowie not only helped produce, the iconic singer also played saxophone on.

How does this affect Canadian music or rather – how does Canadian music affect the song?

Ian Hunter fell in love with a bunch of predominantly Canadian dudes. Young dudes. All of them. So much so – permission was granted to allow the use of David Bowie’s song’s name as the bands name ….

All cool … right? Oh so wrong in the end.

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Henman and Segarini - courtesy of Oliver Clarke

“It all started for me in 1974 when Bob Segarini called me to his apartment on Marcil Ave for a “meeting”.” Says former ( and current?) lead guitarist of All the Young Dudes – David Henman. “It turned out he wanted to put a band together.”

Henman and his brother Ritchie, had left April Wine and knew Segarini from his band; ‘the Wackers’.

“Segarini came to Montreal from Stockton California.” Continues Dave. “Their drummer broke his arm in a diving accident, and my brother Ritchie subbed for a few months. I was performing in a band called Silver at the time. One night at a club called the Five Aces, Bob showed up with his entire entourage just as I was finishing a set. He walked right up to me and complimented me on my music – it was a life-changing moment.”

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The ‘ new ‘ band included Ritchie Henman  and Wayne Cullen on drums, Kootch Trochim and Bob Segarini on bass and rhythm guitar respectively – and finally a young Brian Greenway and David on lead guitar.

“We were a pop band” Says Henman. “We wrote great songs and had an exciting, highly unpredictable live show. Bob was our front man, and his skill at engaing an audience is legendary.

“We had two lead guitars in the band. Since guitar players love guitar, the more the merrier. You can never have enough guitars, or guitarists. We enjoyed some legendary jams with the likes of Frank Marino, and many others.”

David continues the story.

“Originally, it was a seven-piece band with a keyboard player who left after only a few weeks.” Says David.” We were called All the Young Dudes. Bob, Kootch, Brian and I were singers so- four frontman. I believe we recognized Bob was the main singer / songwriter and resident genius.

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Segarini was able to attract the attention of the American music media instantly, in very short order the group was signed to Columbia Records. It was the biggest signing bonus that year for the company.

“We signed a management deal with Fred Heller, who was also managing Phoebe Snow, Ian Hunter and Blood, Sweat and Tears. Our lawyer was Nat Weiss – a former partner of the Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein.” Explains Henman.

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Segarini - photo courtesy of Oliver Clarke

“We recorded an album at Le Studio in Morin Heights. The producer was Mark Spector. He was the “Head of Contemporary A & R” at Columbia. He had previously produced a 1974 album by Tom Rush; ‘Ladies Love Outlaws’. As it turned out, he was a producer who did not know how to produce.”

The band recorded exclusively at Morin Heights which gave time for the everyone to have ‘fun’. Says Henman;

“…you work hard, you play hard. We were truly excessive, but it was mostly booze.”

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The album, called “We’re No Angels”, was essentially ‘garbage ‘ according to Henman. “Despite all the time and effort and money invested, Spector managed to make it sound like it was recorded under water. We heard the recordings as we were going yet when it came time for Mark and his engineer to mix the album, we were informed that we (the artist) were not welcome in the studio”.

David goes on; “Once we heard it, we tried everything to stop the album from being released.”

‘All the Young Dudes’ spent the next few weeks opening for the Bee Gees. There were a few gigs in Quebec and the Martimes yet primarily in Ontario.

Then – as quickly as it started; it was over …

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“The band never officially disbanded.” Says Henman.”We all got together in 1997 and released an album of demos which had been recorded before our first album.There were also new tracks on the album which were supposed to be on our second album which was never released. A gig at a bar on the West Island named Clydes was also part of the reunion.”

Stay tuned for part two as drummer Wayne Cullen joins the discussion …

Some Photos courtesy of Oliver Clarke

David Henman; The Man Behind the Wine – Part One

Once upon a time …

In a galaxy far, far away from iPods.

Two cousins sat down in the Old Mill Tavern in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The year was 1969. They ordered a pitcher of beer and complained of the lack of momentum their music had gathered.

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They thought of putting a new group together. A band which would consist of the brother of one of the beer drinkers on drums and the other; a former member of the other ale quaffer’s band.

They ‘stole’ the singer / guitarist away from his band in Cape Breton, started rehearsing in one of their parents’ basements in Sackville and – just like that, one of Canada’s most successful rock bands were born …

The men in question were David Henman on guitars and vocals, Ritchie Henman on drums, Jim Henman on bass and Myles Goodwyn on vocals and guitars. The name of the band …?

April Wine

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” Myles agreed to join us, and we had planned to start out as a cover band. That all changed the moment Myles played us a couple of songs he wrote.” Says David Henman. “All of us have slightly different memories of how we formed but these are the basic facts.”

According to David ; Myles, long known as the leader and principle songwriter of April Wine, took control from the beginning in the songwriting department.

“He very quickly established himself as the most gifted and most driven musician and songwriter in the group. No one questioned that fact.”

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April Wine hosted a lot of their own shows in the early days and one of the very first gigs Henman remembers was for a theatre group. The band had became involved with the actors at the Neptune Theatre and wrote music for a 13th (?) century play called; “The Lion in Winter.”

Aside from particular items like the above, Henman’s memories of the first four years of the group are vague. He does remember being obsessed with writing songs and recalls why he and Myles were worlds apart in their songwriting ideas.

” Myles was more commercially – oriented and I was more experimental.” States Henman on the two very different approaches to songwriting.”I was also into music like Captain Beefheart and Frank Zappa while Myles was into r and b and blues.”

Goodwyn’s technique is apparent from the start of Wine’s career. ‘Fast Train‘ was one of the first songs Myles wrote and evolved into the band’s first hit. A song which to this date – remains David’s all time favourite April Wine song.

A fast train was what April Wine was now on in the music business. The year was 1970 and things were going quicky …

“We signed with Terry Flood management and Aquarius records.” Says David . “We recorded our first album; ‘April Wine’, with Bill Hill producing. The second one – ‘On Record’, was produced by Ralph Murphy and it marked the first without my cousin.”

Jim Henman, one of the founding members – left and was replaced by Jim Clench.

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As the band were recording their third album; ‘Electric Jewels‘ – David and Ritchie left the band in a mutually – decided split.Myles was now the last original member when he and Clench decided to keep the band going …

“I was invited to join a reformed April Wine but my brother wasn’t.” Says David . “Ritchie and I have always been pretty loyal to each other, so I decided to abstain”. All these years later, David Henman has no regrets for his decision to not rejoin the band just before they hit it big.

“No. No regrets. I was young and given to temptation. My sense is that I ‘d have ended up a casualty ( of rock ).” Declares David.

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Despite the split, David and Ritchie have kept in touch over the years with Myles. David says they are, in many respects – a family.

” I have been a fan and an admirer of Myles Goodwyn from day one. We often run into each other and these past couple of years he has invited me to join the band on stage.” An offer which Henman took with a smile.

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Ritchie and David Henman’s departure from one of the-soon-to-be iconic Canadian Rock Bands did not dissuade the duo from carrying on.

The brothers formed a band named ‘Silver’ following their departure and the band played constantly for a couple of years. The music was a mixture of covers and David Henman originals. Once that music formation ran it’s course, the brothers discovered themselves playing with a familiar name to April Wine fans;

‘All the Young Dudes’, the brother’s new band which performed all originals during it’s year of existence, featured Bob Segarini and a young guitar player named Brian Greenway ( Brian eventually landed with April Wine in 1977 and remains to this day).

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In 1976, David then struck out on his own with ‘The Debutantes’.

Between then and now – bands with names like; ‘Sensible Shoes’,’ Dancer’ and ‘The Business’ came and went.

Finally, in 2003, David Henman starting recording and playing under his own name. Something he continues to do in his basement studio in Bolton, Ontario.

In a galaxy far,far away from turntables!

Please stay tuned for part two and more of Henman’s story ….

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Photos courtesy of David Henman

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