Rick Keene Music Scene – Fifty-Five Years; Fifty- Five Minutes of Musical Influences

A person listens to a lot of music in fifty -five years.

Almost immediately upon birth, music is introduced. Chances are a soft nursery rhyme or perhaps classical music is dangling above your head as you lay comfortably in a crib. More likely; Mom is singing you to sleep.

Please listen below to some of the songs that started my love affair with music over the past fifty-five years.

Festival de la Voix Here

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Listen to The Sunday Papers

It is the day to unwind.

It is a day of rest traditionally and not to be bombarded by negativity or work. The mind requires a haven, a place to recharge and build immunity.

Sammy Jackson

Canada has a lot to offer each day through music and if a Canadian musician is not performing on a tune ; chances are, a Canadian is involved somehow.

Billy Ray CyrusWritten and Produced in Canada

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music (including Billy Ray Cyrus), some Music News and Things That Make You Go Hmmm …

Festival de la Voix Here

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Wide Mouth Mason; A Musical ‘Stew’ and Tales with The Stones

Sometimes – music is good enough to have a second go round …

Wide Mouth Mason have been around. The album Stew helped launch them into the worlds of AC / DC, ZZ Top and The Rolling Stones.

Sean Verreault – Right

Stew was an album which was the band’s funkiest project. Diversity is the key to keeping things fresh and WMM enjoys keeping things fresh.

Please listen below as Shaun Verreault discusses opening for The Stones and the reason why Wide Mouth Mason do not rest on their laurels.

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Don’t Live in the Past; Explore the Future …

If The Beatles did not play live, there would have been no records and no radio airplay.

What would the world of music and the world itself be like if that did not happen? Artists need to grow and be heard if music will continue to soothe the souls of the planet. The souls need music more than ever right now.

Salome Bey – 1933 -2020

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music and Some Music News

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Dr. Trevor Payne Pays Tribute To Salome Bey

All rise.

Salome Bey was one of a kind. An artist. A person whose tools made an impact on the world.

Scroll below to Listen To My Interview with Dr. Trevor Payne

Salome Bey (October 10, 1933 – August 8, 2020) was an American-born Canadian singer-songwriter, composer, and actress who lived in Toronto Ontario since 1966.

In 2005, she was made an honorary Member of the Order of Canada.

Born to a middle-class African-American family in New Jersey, Bey formed a vocal group with her brother Andy Bey and sister Geraldine Bey (de Haas), known as Andy and the Bey Sisters. She performed in local clubs and toured North America and Europe. After moving to Toronto in 1964 and playing the jazz club circuit, she became known as “Canada’s First Lady of Blues”.

Bey appeared on Broadway in Your Arms Too Short to Box with God, for which she was nominated for a Grammy Award for her work on the cast album. She put together a blues & jazz cabaret show on the history of black music, Indigo – which earned her the Dora Mavor Moore Award for outstanding performance. The show was later taped for TV networks.

Bey recorded two albums with Horace Silver, and released live albums of her performances with the Montreal Jubilation Gospel Choir and at the Montreux Jazz Festival.

She was part of the Canadian super-group Northern Lights which performed the charity single “Tears Are Not Enough” in 1985. Bey can be seen in the music video for the song singing the line “Every woman, child and man” with Mark Holmes of Platinum Blonde and Lorraine Segato of The Parachute Club.

Beginning in her early sixties, Bey began showing signs of dementia. As of 2011 her illness had progressed to the point that she could no longer perform.

Please listen below as Dr. Trevor Payne of The Montreal Jubilation Gospel Choir Pays Homage to Salome Bey.

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Saturday, In The Park …

All rise.

“We hear that phrase when presidents or judges come into the room,” says Porter, “but I’m thinking all of us rise – not just one person being exalted. We are all exalted and lifted up by love. This is my political thought and my real truth. It comes from my personality, my mother’s personality, the personality of the blues, and of black people. It’s this idea of making do with the scraps, of resurrection and ascension, and of whatever the current situation is, it can get better through love.” 

– Gregory Porter

Selwyn Birchwood is a master storyteller—both lyrically and musically. He’s an impressive, hard-crunching, modern blues guitarist. His fretwork is high-energy, raw and vivid…knife-edged leads and roadhouse-rattling grooves. He is graced with a depth and maturity that would be impressive in a grizzled veteran, let alone a fresh-faced young man.” —Living Blues

Shemekia Copeland is one of the great blues voices of our time. No one comes close to the sheer firepower that Copeland conjures at will.”
Chicago Tribune

Champian Fulton Celebrates Charlie Parker’s Centennial with Birdsong
Featuring Tenor Saxophonist Scott Hamilton 

Due out August 28, 2020 

Jimmy Heath, a prolific saxophonist, composer and bandleader who played alongside some of the biggest names of jazz, including Miles Davis and John Coltrane, has died.

Heath died Sunday morning in Loganville, Georgia of natural causes, his grandson told NPR. He was 93 years old. His family was at his side, including his wife of 60 years, Mona Heath, his children Mtume and Rozie, his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and his brother, drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath.

In a career that spanned seven decades, Heath brought the bebop he loved to big bands — and into the 21st century.

Heath is best known as a saxophonist, but he wrote and arranged music throughout his life. In 2013, when he was 87 years old, he told NPR it was important to be a complete musician. “Not just to stand up and improvise,” he stressed. “You know, you got to compose. I want to be a person who can compose, and leave something here for posterity.”

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Spend An Afternoon with Rick

Some things cannot be explained.

Out of the air – signals are transmitted to artists everywhere. Some soft, some hard – most magnificent in their originality.

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music and Some Music News

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Rick Keene Music Scene – The Best New Tunes

Music is created everyday.

Music knows no disease and it is the ultimate cure for most ailments.

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music Released This Week

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Monday New Tunes and Beware the Ides of June?

The Ides are in every month whether you eat a Caesar salad or not …

Monday is the day many establishments reopen around the world. Be afraid or breathe a sigh of relief ? Your call.

In the words of Paul McCartney; ‘Live and let die?’

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music Released This Week and Some Music Information.

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Rick Keene Music Scene – The Best New Tunes

Music is created everyday.

Music knows no disease and it is the ultimate cure for most ailments.

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music Released This Week

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Rick Keene Music Scene – The Best New Tunes

Music is created everyday.

Music knows no disease and it is the ultimate cure for most ailments.

Please listen below to some of The Best New Music Released This Week

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Montreal’s Top Musicians

The best music is not always greener on the other side of the street.

Montreal is a hotbed for musicians of all genres and styles. The diversity and the language make Montreal as unique as a two horned Unicorn.

Please listen below to some of Montreal’s Best Bands and Solo Artists.

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Burger Town Blues Playlist

“If you cannot pay your rent – that’s The Blues …”

Howlin’ Wolf’s quote above defines The Blues more than most. The Blues are the cornerstone of popular music as we know it and it is the most enduring genre of music in it’s purest form.

Most people walking around on this planet are struggling. The elite, the Kings and Queens – oblivious to the troubles of the every-man and woman. The Blues is the music of the people.

Please listen below to Burger Town’s Blues Playlist

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Smoke Meat Pete Blues Playlist

“If you cannot pay your rent – that’s The Blues …”

Howlin’ Wolf’s quote above defines The Blues more than most. The Blues are the cornerstone of popular music as we know it and it is the most enduring genre of music in it’s purest form.

Most people walking around on this planet are struggling. The elite, the Kings and Queens – oblivious to the troubles of the every-man and woman. The Blues is the music of the people. A beacon for common sense to unite and prosper from the knowledge they are not alone. Money, relationships, addictions – all part of the inner conflicts which are paraded on stages throughout the world in the form of The Blues.

Smoke Meat Pete

Please listen below to Smoke Meat Pete’s Blues Playlist

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Smoke Meat Pete Blues Playlist

“If you cannot pay your rent – that’s The Blues …”

Howlin’ Wolf’s quote above defines The Blues more than most. The Blues are the cornerstone of popular music as we know it and it is the most enduring genre of music in it’s purest form.

Most people walking around on this planet are struggling. The elite, the Kings and Queens – oblivious to the troubles of the every-man and woman. The Blues is the music of the people. A beacon for common sense to unite and prosper from the knowledge they are not alone. Money, relationships, addictions – all part of the inner conflicts which are paraded on stages throughout the world in the form of The Blues.

Smoke Meat Pete

Please listen below to Smoke Meat Pete’s Blues Playlist

Smoke Meat Pete Take Out and Delivery Here

Rick Keene Music Scene – 41st Annual Blues Music Awards

“If you cannot pay your rent – that’s The Blues …”

On Sunday, May 3, The Blues Foundation announced the winners of the 41st Annual Blues Music Awards, the blues world’s highest honors. Newcomer Christone “Kingfish” Ingram led all recipients with five awards, winning in every category in which he was nominated. He took the trophies for Album Of The Year, Contemporary Blues Album Of The Year and Best Emerging Artist Album for his Alligator Records debut, Kingfish. He was also named Contemporary Male Blues Artist Of The Year and Best Instrumentalist – Guitar.

The Nick Moss Band Featuring Dennis Gruenling (with Moss on guitar and Gruenling on harmonica) was named Band Of The Year, and won in all three categories in which they were nominated. Their Alligator Records album Lucky Guy! won Traditional Blues Album Of The Year. The album’s title track, written by Moss, won the Song Of The Year award.

Two other Alligator artists were also award winners. Vocalist Shemekia Copeland won for Contemporary Blues Female Artist Of The Year. Rick Estrin, leader of Rick Estrin & The Nightcats, won for Best Instrumentalist – Harmonica.

The 41st Annual Blues Music Awards ceremony, hosted by Shemekia Copeland from her home, was presented online with contributions from artists all over the world. Presenters included Charlie Musselwhite, Warren Haynes, Fantastic Negrito, Ruthie Foster, William Bell, Beth Hart, and Keb’ Mo’.

Copeland

The awards were originally scheduled to be presented in Memphis on May 7, 2020, before being moved online due to the coronavirus epidemic.

Complete List of Winners Here

Smoke Meat Pete

Please listen below to some great Blues’ covers of Rolling Stones’ songs.

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Rick Keene Music Scene – Smoke Meat Pete’s Blues History

“If you cannot pay your rent – that’s The Blues …”

Howlin’ Wolf’s quote above defines The Blues more than most. The Blues are the cornerstone of popular music as we know it and it is the most enduring genre of music in it’s purest form.

Most people walking around on this planet are struggling. The elite, the Kings and Queens – oblivious to the troubles of the every-man and woman. The Blues is the music of the people. A beacon for common sense to unite and prosper from the knowledge they are not alone. Money, relationships, addictions – all part of the inner conflicts which are paraded on stages throughout the world in the form of The Blues.

Smoke Meat Pete

Please listen below to some history of The Blues on Smoke Meat Pete’s Blues Playlist

Smoke Meat Pete Take Out and Delivery Here

Louis Janelle Says; ‘Dance Everybody’ !

Louis Janelle built his first drum kit and also his first guitar …

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Janelle’s music on his new album ‘ Dance Everybody ‘ – as pure as snowflakes on Willie Dixon’s tongue. Every genre responsible for modern day music is represented by Louis and his band.

Please listen below as Louis explains everything about himself ( within reason) and his new album.

Louis?

 

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unnamed copy

 

Jarrett Lobley Project Click here!
Jarrett Lobley Project
Click here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Talk with a Blues Legend; Mr. James Cotton. Part One and Two.

James Cotton requires no introduction…

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Introduced to the music of Sonny Boy Williamson at the age of nine – seventy-eight years later; there’s no looking back.

Cotton has played with everyone who is anyone in the history of The Blues. B.B. King, Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon, Little Walter, John Lee Hooker, Eric Clapton … The history pages are not big enough to contain a list ..

James Cotton’s main ‘gig’ was playing with Muddy Waters’ band for twelve years, an apprenticeship which earned him the chops and the right to become the most sough after harmonica player in the Blues – if not music.

HARMONICA MASTER JAMES COTTON TO PERFORM IN MONTREAL!

“Among the greats of all time…He blazes on harp with brilliant virtuosity.” –Rolling Stone

Grammy Award-winning harmonica master James “Mr. Superharp” Cotton and his band, touring in support of his latest Grammy-nominated CD, COTTON MOUTH MAN, will give a special performance with Taj Mahal and John Mayall at the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal in Montréal on Saturday, June 27, 2015.

James Cotton’s most recent CD, COTTON MOUTH MAN is a joyous celebration of Cotton’s 71 years as a professional musician (beginning at age nine). Cotton has recorded almost 30 solo albums, including two highly-regarded releases for Alligator in the 1980s, the famed Harp Attack! with Junior Wells, Carey Bell and Billy Branch in 1990 and the Grammy-nominated Giant in 2011.

Recently, the Fes2013 Blues Music Award for Traditional Blues Male Artist Of The Year.

He also won three Living Blues Critics’ Poll Awards including Blues Artist Of The Year (Male), Album Of The Year (for COTTON MOUTH MAN) and Most Outstanding Musician (Harmonica).

Cotton’s current road band includes vocalist Darrell Nulisch, drummer Jerry Porter, bassist Noel Neal and guitarist Mark Williams. Concert information is as follows:

Date: Saturday, June 27, 2015
Event: Festival International de Jazz de Montréal
Venue: Place des Arts – Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier
Address: 175 Rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
City: Montréal, Canada
Phone: 514-871-1881
Showtime: 7:30pm
Ticket price: $59.00-$80.50 (taxes and fees included)

Please listen to part one and two of my interview with Mr. Cotton …

*James recently survived a bout with throat cancer – please excuse his hoarseness.

 

Visit James Here!

James is appearing at the Montreal International Jazz festival on June 27th. Buy Tickets Here!


 

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sceen card

 

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Johnny Beaudine; History of Chicago Blues – Part Two

How many times has someone brought you to their car and showed you a double barrel shotgun in the trunk?

How many times was it a legendary musician who used it to show strength?

Well – Sax player and Chicago -born Blues player Johnny Beaudine may be one of very few who can answer in the affirmative.

Buddy Guy and Rick Keene
Buddy Guy and Rick Keene

 

Please listen to find out who the musician was and many more great tales from the South Side of Chicago …

Johnny?

 

Buy Tics Here!
Buy Tics Here!

 

daverick

 

cyndi

 

 

Buddy Guy! Live and Alive with Energy!

How can words describe it?

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Quinn Sullivan

It’s not everyday a living legend takes the stage. A man who learned his guitar – playing craft, not by playing, by listening to the masters of the Blues  themselves.

Think of J.K Rowling sitting next to John Steinbeck or Ernest Hemingway and learning how to write. That is exactly what Buddy Guy lived. In lieu of these famous authors, Guy sat down with legends such as Muddy Waters, T- Bone Walker and B.B. King. Friday night at the Metropolis in Montreal, the seventy- six year old passed on his lessons to a sold – out crowd.

Following a jaw – dropping set by Guy’s prodigal child; fourteen year old Quinn Sullivan, Buddy took the stage and made sure everyone knew what was on his mind .. ‘ Damn Right I Got the Blues!’

That opening song, introduced Guy to a 2013 audience in fine style. The very same tune which placed him on the map to stardom in  1991. Fame may have come late in a career that saw Guy play on Muddy Water’s ‘Live at the Copacabana’ in 1967 yet once it arrived – there has been no turning back.

Never mind the licks, the precision finger – picking’ which has established Guy as one of the finest guitar players ever, it is when Buddy opens his mouth to sing – that’s when a spectator is aware, a special moment is present. The power that escapes his mouth like a circus performer shot from a cannon, is so overwhelming – everyone’s little hairs on the back of their necks stand on guard for Buddy. It is that profound.

buddy1

Hoochie Coochie Man, the Willie Dixon – penned classic song made famous by Muddy Waters, allowed Guy the looseness to pay homage to his elders and teachers. His voice resonating around the club like a boomerang flying around the globe – returning to the home of the Blues each time. Guy’s fingers,  older compared to a guitarist like Keith Richards, a man who is seven years Guy’s junior. Buddy’s digits remain. Stalled at the age of twenty.

‘Someone Else is Steppin’ In’ demonstrated Guy’s experience. His ease on stage. A self – noted shy man offstage spins tales of love lost while integrating the lyrics of pain and heartbreak from the soul of a man who has been there a couple of times. Humor and that look – oh that look which freezes the most cold man in his tracks. When Buddy Guy speaks or sings – people listen.
Some people write lyrics. Some people sing lyrics. Some people live lyrics.
aaaa“Let the Door Knob Hit Ya’ continued the tale and the wit through words and licks.
Guy’s guitar becoming the voice of both sarcasm and truth. The ‘punters’ – lapping up each word and note like kittens hungry for their lost Mothers.
Half the people in the crowd – dumbfounded with the  energy and the ‘court’ which Guy holds as one of the last cogs in the Blues’ long and eventful history. Part Jester and part King.

‘I Just Want Make Love to You’, signaled a torch which was lit by Muddy Waters via Willie Dixon in 1954. A fire which sounds good when the Rolling Stones play it. However as the sultry chords and sexy lyrics echoed through the venue, the iconic song hit closer to home through Buddy Guy. The real apprentice of the Blues’ greats shining through with a smile and a wink. History heard. History played. History never sounded so good …

“I’ve been all around the world, everywhere is home/drank wine with Kings and the Rolling Stones/I got a few scars from the battles I won, ’cause I’m 74 years young”

Those words, autobiographical at the time they were written, summedqqqqqqqqqq up the mood of the crowd. Everyone aware of Guy’s ‘legendary status. A musician, if he / she or they survive,  reaches different levels as time goes by. The inevitable rise and peak, the fall, the rise and the exit or staying power. At one point – regardless of hits or ‘chart topper’, a plateau of God – like status is obtained and held until death. Guy is at that point in his life and career. He is the man along with B.B. King as the last men standing from an age which saw the Blues and Gospel, the Godfathers of so many genres, give birth. Guy’s guitar playing on ’74 years young’? Hendrix is smiling somewhere.

‘Drowning on Dry Land’ summoned the next leg of the Blues journey to the stage as Quinn Sullivan joined his mentor for a last lap towards the finish line of the show.
Combined with ‘Strange Brew’ – Cream’s biggest and most devilish tune, Sullivan and Guy traded licks, looks and love.
Love for each other, love for the guitar and love for the Blues. Buddy Guy discovered Quinn at the age of seven. Mr. Sullivan is only now discovering Guy in his purest form as his age is allowing him the view of a non  starry – eyed student.
‘Skin Deep’ and ‘Voodoo Chile’, a pair of  songs before a medley engulfed the Metropolis. Sullivan and Guy – note by note, lick by lick stealing each others glory. Back and forth they battled and played. Something to see as a music fan. The elder statesman and the younger student dueling in friendship. Sullivan displaying maturity beyond his years and Buddy discovering youth through and beyond Sullivan.

Damn right I got the Blues …

buddy2

Just Between You and Me

 Le ‘Set – Up ‘

Toting a box of beer up a flight of stairs on a Saturday morning led to an encounter that would shape the rest of my life. Who knew?

 

Ste Anne de Bellevue – In the Summertime…

I was toiling as a waiter in a restaurant named Cajun Blues. The establishment was the ‘outcast ‘among the several bars and restaurants situated in the picturesque town of Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC. The reason for the leper – like treatment? The business did not possess a terrace on the waterfront and that absence left a void in the town’s visitors as they arrived to eat.

Ste. Anne be Bellevue is a community that thrives on the promise of the summer sun. The view of the sun’s rays reflecting off waves rooted by the variations of ships and boats is an integral part of the town’s survival. The countless photo -ops are a welcome sight for the lunch and supper crowd that flock to the boardwalk. A ‘luxurious dock ‘ that lays nestled on the western – most tip of the Island of Montreal and remains an attractive location for families , lovers and loners. For some – a mixture of all three. If Mama Nature cooperates, the customers grin while money rains directly into the pocket books of the establishments’ owners. If the matriarch of green decides otherwise – the terraces are as vacant as the property owners’ gas tanks.

            Regardless of the Cajun Blues’lack of such a beautiful image, Saturday night at the eatery was jumping.  Aside from Cajun food staples such as

All Night Long …

Louisiana Mud Pie, Chicken Creole and Jambalaya – the singular item that enticed visitors to fill the clubs’ cozy atmosphere was an eclectic selection of live music.

As the stars and the moon danced high in the darkened sky – invited musicians orchestrated the pairs’ celestial moves with a catalogue of grooves both real and imagined.  Blues was on the dessert menu one evening while an additional soiree wound up crammed with the crisp sounds of a drummer – a ‘ cat ‘ as cool as a northern breeze keeping time among a trio of Jazz musicians as they delivered ‘ last  call ‘ to welcoming applause.

The subsequent week – Reggae was the ‘le soup du jour ‘. The clubs’ patrons would drain their ‘bowls ‘and in the process, fill up their palates with love and joy. Once the main course of unity was completed, the partiers made love to their drinks while the sweet sounds of Marley and Tosh provided a message of hope. The sort of memo that passed spontaneously throughout the crowd and a post – it note Mr.Marley would have permitted.

Rock – a – Bye – Muddy …

It was a unique three months for me as I spent evenings creating new friends and  mornings producing friendship with my two small children .Francesca Emerald Amanda and Owen David Randall remain the beneficiaries of a Father completed by his love for music. Not a day passed without their Dad cooing them to sleep. Lyrics penned by Muddy Waters, Willie Dixon and Louis Armstrong became our lullabies as the virgin eyes on their softened faces closed into dreams of innocence.

These are the memories that stay firmly planted as seeds in the lawn of my soul .Landscaping created for a new generation. Seeds that will spread from my kids – to their very own.

–  Le ‘Show ‘-

        As my head ached and my ears called for silence, I carried the bottles of beer from the basement and placed the crate upon the bar. Standing there, I recalled the previous evenings’ adventures with a smile. This made my head hurt even more …

I had attended a concert by the Canadian rock band AprilWine. A friend and fellow journalist had invited me to join him. ‘ Tagging ‘  along meant the opportunity to not only see the show – a backstage visit was part of the itinerary as my friend was concocting an interview with lead songwriter and singer  – Myles Goodwyn.

The group was one of my many favorites as the suburbs of Montreal nurtured me from adolescence to teen. You Won’t Dance with Me, Oowatanite , Roller , Rock n Roll is a Vicious Game and Just Between You and Me were staples of my teen years and just a few of the hits by the legendary rock band.

April Wine – Then …

I had seen them live a handful of times between the ages of fifteen and twenty and once – I was fortunate enough to enjoy their arena show three times in one-week Toronto on Saturday, Peterborough on Wednesday and Montreal once more on the following Saturday. It was a threesome of the non – sexual type yet sensually pleasing.

The trio of shows wrought envy from the mouths of all my male fellow rock n rollers in the late seventies and for a brief moment in time – I was the coolest person amongst my peers. The boys were jealous yet the ‘chicks ‘dug me. Rock N Roll may be a vicious game but sex is the ultimate trophy to the victors!

So here I was – all these years later, with an opportunity to sing along to the tunes of my youth in the small confines of Le Spectrum .It was an exit on the highway of music I would notbe missing.

An Intimate Engagement

Wine – circa 2001

Time had passed since the days of the band selling out the Montreal Forum. The group had actually broken up for a few years in the late eighties only to re-form in the nineties. They continue touring on a smaller level as they play their music to loyal fans in Canada and the United States. The hits are no longer written by the formerly – proficient Goodwyn yet an arsenal containing songs such as Say Hello , I Like to Rock , Sign of the Gypsy Queen and Weepin Widow were more than enough to carry these former teenagers into the twi –light of their lives and career.

The show and tunes that evening were what I had come to expect from the foursome. High-octane rock performed with conviction at decibels alarming to some. Hit after hit brought grown men and women to their feet. Powerful anthems punctuated by tearful ballads lay witness to a new generation as they writhed in appreciation of the band’s efforts. The line – up consisting of Myles on guitar and vocals , Brian Greenway  on guitar , the late Jim Clench on bass and the powerful Jerry Mercer on drums – did not disappoint the most cynical concert go – er. It was a wonderful summer evening under a cloud of nostalgia.

‘ A High Roller Baby …!’

The show ended with an exclamation point. The song Roller, arguably the band’s biggest hit, was the encore and it whipped the predominant forty – something crowd into frenzy. Everyone it seemed knew the song and there was not a quiet voice in the house as the band elongated the distance of their watermark tune.

The song finished and the group exited the stage to deafening applause. The words; ‘She’s a high roller baby ‘were sung in unison as the throng of people made their way past the exits and onto the streets of downtown Montréal. The lyrics’ High roller baby ‘continued as they echoed through vacant buildings and began eking out a new found existence in a city they once owned.

It was now the time for me to get excited.

A behind – the – curtains visit was not only exciting for the privilege of meeting rock icons, the rendez- vous was also an opportunity for me to discover a few words from the men that had met my idols – the Rolling Stones.

“Going back stage is exciting. Regardless of how many times it has happened. “Annie Liebowitz

 

The entrance alone is usually long and dark followed by a door or curtain guarded closely by a security guard or personnel. A flash of a pass, a nod of a head and suddenly you have elapsed into unknown territory. You are privileged. Depending on the star or stars, thousands and sometimes millions of people are separated from you .Physically and emotionally you have obtained a realm that some may only dream of reaching in their paramount fantasies.

Once, twice or a hundred times – the heart always beats a little faster when a crowd is left behind the curtain at a Rock n Roll show.  Terrence Mann may have had the same awareness as he approached the cornfields in the movie adaptation of the novel Shoeless Joe. Field of Dreams is the name of the film and is there a better way to identify the feelings of disappearing back – stage? Not quite …

Behind the Scenes …

On this evening – a curtain in lieu of a door was my gateway to knowledge and (if lucky) – a few beers. As my partner and I navigated the maze of rooms and people, we remained on the look – out for the subject of my colleague’s interrogation. We discovered Mr.Goodwynin a concrete room conspicuous with its absence of color. He was speaking to a couple of young women as he rested alongside a table outfitted with food. My friend introduced himself and promptly thanked Myles for the opportunity given to not only him – myself as well.

Just Between Myles and Me …

Myles Goodwyn

Myles was aloof and maintained a tone of aristocracy as I extended my hand to his. Habitually, I own the ability to garner good judgment of people. I did not like Myles in the first minute of our meeting and if my children and dog were by my side – I remain confident they would have had the very same feeling. Regardless if Mr.Goodwyn had shaken my hand – my feelings would not have changed.

Arrangements between my friend and Goodwyn to disappear into an atmosphere more fitting for a one – on – one discussion were completed. The lead vocalist informed me to help myself to whatever beverages and food I discovered. Since he made no mention of the women – I assumed they were also ‘up for grabs ‘!

I  asked him where I could unearth the remaining members of the band and he pointed down the hall, toward the loud noise. The ‘ noise ‘was the sound of the many ‘back stagers ‘who seemed to be enjoying themselves a lot more than I was. The fact that I was soon to be part of their ruckus –  made the departure from my friend much more tolerable.

The 1970’s – Comfortably Numb

As I watched the two disappear, I understood – from this point forward, the evening could possibly conclude in many variations. It depended on which choices I would make in the ensuing couple of hours and just how much I wanted to re – live the late seventies. Since I do not recall much of the late seventies, I walked down the hall with an ear toward a sinful evening.  The ‘good angel ‘and the ‘bad angel ‘had quite the ‘heated discussion’ as they sat opposite one another on each of my shoulders . I entered a room and approached the walls of people …

To be continued …