Rick Keene Music Scene – All That Jazz

Jazz at Princeton University Announces Diverse and Compelling Season


 
October 12, 2019 – May 9, 2020
 
Guest artists include Portuguese vocalist/composer Sara Serpa with Nigerian writer Emmanuel Iduma, Chilean vocal sensation Claudia Acuña, & Grammy-nominated Cuban drummer & MacArthur Fellow Dafnis Prieto
 
Faculty groups are led by Jazz at Princeton head Rudresh Mahanthappa, Trineice Robinson-Martin, Jay Clayton, Matthew Parrish, Darcy James Argue
 
2nd annual Princeton University Jazz Festival slated for Saturday, April 18, 2020

Jazz at Princeton University, helmed by acclaimed saxophonist/composer Rudresh Mahanthappa, presents a thrilling and diverse 2019-2020 season, October 12, 2019 – May 9, 2020. Highlights include performances by student groups joined by guest artists including acclaimed Portuguese vocalist/composer Sara Serpa with her Intimate Strangers project, Chilean vocal sensation Claudia Acuña, and Grammy-nominated Cuban drummer Dafnis Prieto. After a resoundingly successful inaugural year, Jazz at Princeton will also present the second annual Princeton University Jazz Festival on April 18, 2020.
“I’m very excited about the depth and breadth of this year’s Jazz at Princeton program,” says Mahanthappa. “With the contribution of some of jazz’s most inventive artists working alongside our accomplished students, we are hosting concerts that will engage, inspire and entertain. Last year’s launch of the annual Princeton University Jazz Festival was a great success, and the second edition promises to be just as outstanding.”

Jazz at Princeton’s six major student ensembles include the Creative Large Ensemble directed by Darcy James Argue, Small Groups I and A directed by Mahanthappa, Small Group X directed by Matthew Parrish, the Jazz Vocal Collective directed by Trineice RobinsonMartin, and the Vocal Improvisation Ensemble directed by Jay Clayton.

2019-2020 Season

Saturday, October 12, 2019 –Rudresh Mahanthappa Tiger Quartet+ 
8 pm, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall.  Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/rudresh-mahanthappa-tiger-quartet



Acclaimed alto saxophonist and Jazz at Princeton head leads a select group of students in a concert to kick off the season.

Friday, November 8, 2019– Sara Serpa’s Intimate Strangers
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/intimate-strangers.



A collaboration between Portuguese vocalist-composer Sara Serpa and Nigerian writer Emmanuel Iduma that draws inspiration from Iduma’s latest book, A Stranger’s Pose, a unique blend of travelogue, musings and poetry, with a foreword by Teju Cole. In a combination of music, text, image and field recordings collected by Iduma during his travels, Intimate Strangers explores themes of movement, home, grief, absence and desire in what Iduma calls “an atlas of a borderless world.” Co-sponsored by Jazz at Princeton and the Program in African Studies.

Sara Serpa – voice, composition | Emmanuel Iduma – text, spoken word
Sofía Rei, Aubrey Johnson – voice | Matt Mitchell -piano | Qasim Naqvi – modular synth 

Sara Serpa is a singer, composer, improviser who implements a unique instrumental approach to her vocal style. Recognized for her distinctive wordless singing, Serpa has been immersed in the field of jazz, improvised and experimental music since first arriving in New York in 2008.  Described by JazzTimes as “a master of wordless landscapes” and by the New York Times as “a singer of silvery poise and cosmopolitan outlook,” Serpa started her recording and performing career with jazz luminaries such as Grammy-nominated pianist Danilo Perez, Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow pianist Ran Blake, and Greg Osby. Her ethereal music draws from a broad variety of inspirations including literature, film, visual arts as well as history and nature. As a leader, she has produced and released nine albums, (with labels Sunnyside Records, Clean Feed, Tzadik and Inner Circle Music); the latest being “Close Up” in collaboration with saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock and cellist Erik Friedlander. Serpa has collaborated with an extensive array of musicians including John Zorn, Guillermo Klein, Zeena Parkins, Mark Turner, Tyshawn Sorey, and Nicole Mitchell, among many others. She has performed her own music in Europe, Australia, North and South America, singing at international festivals such as Festa do Jazz, the Panama Jazz Festival, Festival de Jazz de Montevideo, Wangaratta Jazz Festival and Adelaide Festival, Sopot Jazz Festival or venues like Bimhuis, Casa da Música, Village Vanguard, Jazz Standard, The Stone, Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Kennedy Center for the Arts, among others.

Emmanuel Iduma is a writer of fiction and nonfiction. Born and raised in Nigeria, he has contributed essays and stories to journals, magazines, artists’ books, and exhibition catalogues. He is the author of The Sound of Things to Come (first published as Farad in Nigeria), and received a 2017 Creative Capital/Warhol Foundation grant in arts writing, for his blog A Sum of Encounters. He is a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts, where he obtained an MFA in Art Criticism and Writing. In 2017, he was associate curator of the Nigerian pavilion at the Venice Biennale. He is the author, most recently, of A Stranger’s Pose.

Saturday, November 16 – Small Groups I and A – led by Rudresh Mahanthappa
8 pm, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-small-groups-concert-2.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Small Groups I and A, directed by award-winning saxophonist and program director Rudresh Mahanthappa, present an evening of jazz at its most intimate in a showcase of improvisation and inspiring interaction. 

Thursday, November 21– Jazz Vocal Collective – led by Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-vocal-collective-2.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Jazz Vocal Collective (JVC), Princeton University’s elite small jazz ensemble that features solo voice, will join director Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin and showcase their original arrangements of classic and contemporary jazz compositions. 

Internationally recognized as one of the leading pedagogues in gospel and soul voice training, Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin specializes in vocal pedagogy and performance practices for contemporary commercial music styles (i.e. jazz, pop, gospel, R&B, country, rock, music theater, etc.). As the creator of Soul Ingredients®, a methodology for nurturing vocal freedom and authentic musical interpretation and expression, Dr. Robinson-Martin regularly travels nationally and internationally teaching voice, lecturing and giving workshops.

Saturday, November 23– Creative Large Ensemble – Led by Darcy James Argue
8 pm, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall.
Tickets and info: 609-258-9220 or https://music.princeton.edu/events/creative-large-ensemble-2.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Creative Large Ensemble led by Darcy James Argue continues to redefine the big band in an innovative program encompassing classic and contemporary repertoire.

Vancouver-born, Brooklyn-based composer and bandleader Darcy James Argue has toured nationally and internationally with his 18-piece ensemble, Secret Society. Argue made his mark with his critically acclaimed 2009 debut Infernal Machines. 2013 saw the release of Brooklyn Babylon, which, like Infernal Machines before it, earned the group nominations for both GRAMMY and JUNO Awards. His most recent recording, Real Enemies, released in the fall of 2016, earned a third consecutive GRAMMY nomination. Secret Society maintains a busy touring schedule, with European, Canadian, and South American tours and four appearances at the Newport Jazz Festival. Argue has also toured Australia and New Zealand leading the Jazzgroove Mothership Orchestra. He has led performances of his music by the WDR Big Band, the Danish Radio Big Band, the Frankfurt Radio Big Band, the Cologne Contemporary Jazz Orchestra, the Big Band Palácio das Artes, and the West Point Jazz Knights. Argue has composed works for chamber duo and string quartet, art songs for Newspeak, and created arrangements for the Atlanta Symphony. In 2015, Argue was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Music Composition and a Doris Duke Artist Award. He has received commissions from the Fromm Music Foundation, the Jazz Gallery, the Manhattan New Music Project, the Jerome Foundation, and BAM, as well as ensembles including the Danish Radio Big Band, the Hard Rubber Orchestra, the West Point Jazz Knights, and the Orquestra Jazz de Matosinhos. He is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, New Music USA, the Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Composers Now, the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the MacDowell Colony.

Wednesday, December 4– Jazz Small Groups in Concert – Led by Rudresh Mahanthappa
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-small-groups-concert-3.

Jazz at Princeton University’s small groups, directed by award-winning saxophonist and program director Rudresh Mahanthappa, leads student small groups in an energizing and beautiful evening of music.

Tuesday, December 10– Jazz Vocal Improvisation Ensemble – Led by Jay Clayton
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-vocal-improvisation-ensemble-2.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Vocal Improvisation Ensemble (VIE), directed by world-renowned Jay Clayton, presents its first performance of the year.

Jay Clayton is an internationally acclaimed vocalist, composer, and educator, whose work boldly spans the terrain between jazz and new music. Jay has gained worldwide attention as both performer and teacher. With more than 40 recordings to her credit, Clayton has appeared alongside such formidable artists as Muhal Richard Abrams, Steve Reich, Kirk Nurock, Julian Priester, Jerry Granelli, Jane Ira Bloom, Gary Bartz, Jack Wilkins, George Cables, Fred Hersch, Gary Thomas, tap dancer Brenda Bufalino as well as fellow vocalists Jeanne Lee, Norma Winstone, Urszula Dudziak and Bobby McFerrin. She has taught extensively throughout the world and was on the jazz faculty of Cornish College of the Arts for 20 years. She is currently on the jazz faculty at Peabody Institute in Baltimore. Her book, “Sing Your Story: A Practical Guide for Learning and Teaching the Art of Jazz Singing,” was published by Advance Music in 2001.

Friday, January 10 – Jazz Small Group X – Led by Matthew Parrish
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-small-group-x-2.

The Princeton University Jazz ‘Ensemble X’ performs under the direction of master bassist Matthew Parrish. This ensemble evokes the small group tradition of the Art Blakey groups of the 50’s and 60’s where improvisation and inspiring interaction are key. The group performs as a septet with several featured trio performances. 

Matthew Parrish is a sought-after performer, arranger, composer, producer, and instructor. Matthew’s warmth in his playing and loyalty to delivering heartfelt, passionate works is apparent in every note, every tune, and every interaction with his fellow musicians. Born in central California, Matthew has performed and recorded with top names in jazz including Regina Carter, Wynton Marsalis, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Paquito D’Rivera, Clark Terry, Etta Jones, Orrin Evans, Clark Terry, Dr. Jonnie Smith, Savion Glover, Bill Charlap, Houston Person, and many others. He has recorded over sixty works, including his debut CD Circles (2000) and his most recent recordings with Karine Aguiar.

Saturday, February 22 – Jazz Vocal Collective with Claudia Acuña
Hear the renowned Chilean jazz singer, songwriter, and arranger share the stage with Jazz at Princeton University’s Jazz Vocal Collective Ensemble (JVC) in a concert that bridges cultures and traditions. The JVC is Princeton University’s elite small jazz student ensemble that features solo voice, directed by Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin.

8 pm, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall. Tickets and info: 609-258-9220 or https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-vocal-collective-claudia-acu%C3%B1a.

Chilean singer/songwriter/arranger Claudia Acuña possesses one of the most beautiful and compelling voices in jazz and creative music. While singing primarily in Spanish, her music crosses language barriers to communicate with power and deep feeling. Born July 3, 1971 in Santiago and raised in Concepcion, Acuña established herself on the Chilean jazz scene in her early 20s. When she arrived in New York City in 1995, Acuña quickly gained recognition as a leading voice on a scene rapidly being transformed by a wave of brilliant Latin American musicians. She plunged into collaborations with masters such as Jason Lindner, Harry Whitaker, Arturo O’Farrill, Guillermo Klein, and bassist Avishai Cohen, who co-produced her critically hailed 2000 debut Wind From the South (Verve). Her five albums as a leader established Acuña as a creative force, from 2002’s Rhythm of Life (Verve) and 2004’s Luna (MaxJazz) through 2008’s In These Shoes (Zoho Music) and 2009’s strikingly beautiful En Este Momento (Marsalis Music). Whether putting her stamp on popular Latin American ballads, reimagining jazz standards from a South American perspective, or infusing Afro-Caribbean material with a wide rhythmic sensibility, Acuña stands out as a passionate and emotionally incisive singer with a gleaming, burnished bronze tone. For much of the past decade she’s put her recording career on the backburner to focus on raising her son. Instead of touring, she’s stayed closer to home, where her keen intelligence and intrepid spirit has made her the vocalist of choice for many of jazz’s most creative figures. She’s thrived by pursuing multiple musical directions with artists such as Susie Ibarra, Billy Childs, Henry Threadgill, the Rodriguez Brothers, and Elio Villa-Franca. Acuña brings all of her far-flung experiences to bear on Turning Pages, an album that documents a major creative leap. Her key collaborator was Colombian-born string wizard Juancho Herrera, who produced the album, co-wrote several songs, and had a major hand in most of the arrangements. As much as Turning Pages points toward the future, the album is also an act of reclamation and recovery, as Acuña takes stock of her past via songs new and old. It’s the work of a woman reborn from the ashes, stronger, wiser, and more expressive than ever. Ready once again to take on the world, she’s eager to reconnect with longtime fans and build new audiences.

Thursday, April 9 – Jazz Small Group X – Led by Matthew Parrish
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-small-group-x-3.

The Princeton University Jazz ‘Ensemble X’ performs under the direction of master bassist Matthew Parrish. This ensemble evokes the small group tradition of the Art Blakey groups of the 50’s and 60’s where improvisation and inspiring interaction are key. The group performs as a septet with several featured trio performances. 

Saturday, April 18 – Princeton University Jazz Festival
Noon, Richardson Lawn. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/princeton-university-jazz-festival-0.

A free day-long outdoor lineup of today’s top jazz stars coming together in exciting formations and alongside Princeton University’s exceptional student jazz ensembles. Further details TBA.

Tuesday, April 21 – Jazz Vocal Improvisation Ensemble – Led by Jay Clayton
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-vocal-improvisation-ensemble-3.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Vocal Improvisation Ensemble (VIE), directed by world-renowned Jay Clayton, presents its final performance of the year.

Thursday, April 23– Jazz Vocal Collective – Led by Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-vocal-collective-3.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Jazz Vocal Collective Ensemble (JVC), Princeton University’s elite small jazz ensemble that features solo voice, will join director Dr. Trineice Robinson-Martin and showcase their original arrangements of classic and contemporary jazz compositions. 

Wednesday, April 29 – Jazz Small Groups I and A – led by Rudresh Mahanthappa
7:30 pm, Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. Free and open to the public. Information at https://music.princeton.edu/events/jazz-small-groups-concert-4.

Jazz at Princeton University’s Small Groups I and A, directed by award-winning saxophonist and program director Rudresh Mahanthappa, present an evening of jazz at its most intimate in a showcase of improvisation and inspiring interaction. 

Saturday, May 9– Dafnis Prieto and Creative Large Ensemble
8 pm, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall. Tickets and info: 609-258-9220 or https://music.princeton.edu/events/dafnis-prieto-creative-large-ensemble.

Jazz at Princeton University’s season comes to a close with GRAMMY Award-winning Cuban-born drummer, composer, bandleader, educator, and MacArthur Fellow Dafnis Prieto joining Darcy James Argue’s Creative Large Ensemble.

From Santa Clara, Cuba, Dafnis Prieto’s revolutionary drumming techniques and compositions have had a powerful impact on the Latin and Jazz music scene, nationally and internationally. Various honors include a 2011 MacArthur Fellowship, Up & Coming Musician of the Year from the Jazz Journalists Association in 2006, a 2018 GRAMMY Award and Latin GRAMMY nomination for Best Latin Jazz Album for Dafnis Prieto Big Band Back to the Sunset, a GRAMMY nomination for Best Latin Jazz Album for Absolute Quintet in 2006, and a Latin GRAMMY nomination for Best New Artist in 2007. Also a gifted educator, Prieto has conducted master classes, clinics, and workshops throughout the world. He was a faculty member of Jazz Studies at NYU from 2005 to 2014, and in 2015 became a faculty member at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami. Since his arrival to New York in 1999, Prieto has worked in bands led by Henry Threadgill, Steve Coleman, Eddie Palmieri, Chico and Arturo O’Farrill, Dave Samuels and The Caribbean Jazz Project, Jane Bunnett, D.D. Jackson, Edward Simon, Michel Camilo, Chucho Valdés, Bebo Valdés, Roy Hargrove, Don Byron, and Andrew Hill, among others. He has performed at many national and international music festivals as a sideman and as a bandleader featuring several of his own projects and music. As a composer, he has created music for dance, film, chamber ensembles, and most notably for his own bands, ranging from duets to big band, and including the distinctively different groups featured on seven acclaimed recordings as a leader: About The Monks, Absolute Quintet, Taking the Soul For a Walk, Si o Si Quartet: Live at Jazz Standard, Dafnis Prieto Proverb Trio, Triangles and Circles, and Back to the Sunset. He has received commissions, grants, and fellowships from Chamber Music America, Jazz at Lincoln Center, East Carolina University, and Meet the Composer. In 2016 Prieto published the critically acclaimed drumming instructional book, A World of Rhythmic Possibilities: Drumming Lessons and Reflections on Rhythms.

Jazz at Princeton University under the direction of Rudresh Mahanthappa serves to promote this uniquely American music as a contemporary and relevant art form.  Our goals are to convey the vast musical and social history of jazz, establish a strong theoretical and stylistic foundation with regard to improvisation and composition, and emphasize the development of individual expression and creativity. Offerings of this program include academic course work, performing ensembles, master classes, private study, and independent projects. They also have the opportunity to participate in academic courses from the music department curriculum that encourage the study of the historical, social, theoretical, stylistic, and creative issues that pertain to the jazz idiom.

Hailed by Pitchfork as “jaw-dropping… one of the finest saxophonists going,” alto saxophonist, composer and educator Rudresh Mahanthappa is widely known as one of the premier voices in jazz of the 21st century. He has over a dozen albums to his credit, including the acclaimed Bird Calls, which topped many critics’ best-of-year lists for 2015 and was hailed by PopMatters as “complex, rhythmically vital, free in spirit while still criss-crossed with mutating structures.” Rudresh has been named alto saxophonist of the year for seven of eight years running in DownBeat Magazine’s International Critics’ Polls (2011-2013, 2015-2018), and for five consecutive years by the Jazz Journalists’ Association (2009-2013) and again in 2016. He won alto saxophonist of the year in the 2015-2017 JazzTimes Magazine Critics’ Polls and was named the Village Voice’s “Best Jazz Artist” in 2015. He has also received the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award, among other honors, and is currently the Anthony H. P. Lee ’79 Director of Jazz at Princeton University.

Born in Trieste, Italy to Indian émigrés in 1971, Mahanthappa was brought up in Boulder, Colorado and gained proficiency playing everything from current pop to Dixieland. He went on to studies at North Texas, Berklee and DePaul University (as well as the Stanford Jazz Workshop) and came to settle in Chicago. Soon after moving to New York in 1997 he formed his own quartet featuring pianist Vijay Iyer. The band recorded an enduring sequence of albums, Black WaterMother Tongue and Codebook, each highlighting Mahanthappa’s inventive methodologies and deeply personal approach to composition. He and Iyer also formed the duo Raw Materials.

Coming deeper into contact with the Carnatic music of his parents’ native southern India, Mahanthappa partnered in 2008 with fellow altoist Kadri Gopalnath and the Dakshina Ensemble for Kinsmen, garnering wide acclaim. Apti, the first outing by Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition (with Pakistani-born Rez Abbasi on guitar and Dan Weiss on tabla), saw release the same year; Agrima followed nine years later and considerably expanded the trio’s sonic ambitions.

Mahanthappa has also worked with Jack DeJohnette, Mark Dresser, Danilo Pérez, Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra, the collaborative trios MSG and Mauger, the co-led quintet Dual Identity with fellow altoist Steve Lehman, and another co-led quintet with fellow altoist and Chicago stalwart Bunky Green (Apex). His exploratory guitar- driven quartets on Samdhi and Gamak featured David Gilmore and Dave “Fuze” Fiuczynski, respectively. In 2015 he was commissioned by Ragamala Dance to create Song of the Jasmine for dancers and a hybrid jazz/South Indian ensemble. He was also commissioned by the PRISM Saxophone Quartet to compose a chamber piece, “I Will Not Apologize for My Tone Tonight,” which can be heard on the quartet’s 2015 double- disc release Heritage/Evolution, Volume 1

Smoke Meat Pete Live Music Schedule Here

Rick Keene Music Scene – Album Release of The Week

Not many albums are great.

Most new albums contain four or five great tracks and the rest are fillers. Not by choice – it is just the nature of the beast. It is hard to write ten or more great songs. It is hard to come up with new stuff in 2019.

It turns out young dogs can teach old tricks. Old school music tends to endure. Old school rhythms cannot be beat.

Have a listen below to some tracks from the album of the week. Ben Racine Band Live a Montreal.

Visit Ben Racine Band Here !

Rick Keene Music Scene; Top Ten Musician New Year’s Resolutions 

The new year brings hope.

 

 

Not just for regular folk, business people or pets. More than anyone, artists and musicians require a changing of course to right a sometimes leaky boat. It ain’t easy maneuvering the seas of art, just ask the Flock of Seagulls circling aimlessly overhead.

Here now are The Top Ten Musician New Year’s Resolutions. 

10. In 2018, out of respect for my spouse, I will no longer sleep with the man / woman in row 4, seat 6 …

 

9. ‘ Moves Like Jagger ‘ doesn’t work live unless you ‘move like Jagger … ‘

 

8. No more gigs with ‘money for nothing and chicks for free …’

 

7. Investigate the reason why my manager is driving a Porsche while I take the bus …

 

6. No more appearances at 5am on ‘Tom Cruise’s Telethon of Scientology’ 

 

5. Don’t enter any more contests where I have to pay for winning! 

 

4. No more gigs that are interrupted by badly played hockey by the Montreal Canadiens.  

 

3. Before singing ‘when I think about you I touch myself’ at a wedding gig, make sure Harvey Weinstein’s victims are not in attendance. 

 

2. ‘You Dropped a Bomb on Me’ must be scratched from the set list before touring North Korea. 

 

And the #1 Musician New Year’s Resolution ? 

 

1. If I actually write a song, I can stop delivering pizzas full time ! 

 

Rick Keene Music Scene – See Spot Run Celebrate Thirty – Five Years in Powerful Style.

It all started in the basement

That’s  usually the spot rebel teenagers get together to ‘ under ‘ mine their parents’ and society’s rules. Randy Bowen and Chris Brodbeck were no different. 

Thirty five years later – the duo, along with the ‘new’ bandmates Aaron Little ( guitar ) and Dave Fudge ( Drums ) returned to the place where it kind of all started. Le Pionnier in Pte Claire. Le starting point. 

Local sensation and legendary songwriter / producer Jeff Smallwood opened things up with an acoustic set. Smallwood has known the band since the beginning and it was only fitting for him to set the stage. Cover versions of April Wine and Pagliaro set the tone and Smallwood’s version of Safety Dance -turned-ballad was eye opening. Smallwood’s musings a history lesson and a treat to witness one of Montreal’s great ( and unsung ) talents. 

Smallwood

Appearance wise , See Spot Run must have released their album Ten Stories High when they were playing with their Tonka trucks. Rock n Roll may be a vicous game but for See Spot Run; it’s the fountain of youth. 

Randy Bowen and Aaron Little dueled the guitar work with precision on songs that splattered their career. ‘ Au Naturel ‘ and ‘Lucy‘ from their debut album on display in full power. The Neo Punk Alternative vibrations creating a buzz in the crowd to both the fanbase and the music virgins. Considering all the music played on radio today , it’s a puzzle why more people do not wake up on their morning drives to the combined harmonies and spunk within a See Spot Run CD. 

Fudge and Brodbeck sustain the foundation with a professionalism second to none. This battery is both heavy and soft to maintain a perfect equilibrium with the twists and turns of the band’s catalogue. 

Terrified ‘ , ‘Gonna Get Ya ‘ and ‘Let It Go ‘ – a trio of tunes framing the band’s career. Catchy , hard driving and formulaic for See Spot Run. Caressing Brodbeck’s vocals for their unique sound while implanting a relentless energy into the pulse of the punters. ‘My IPad Killed my Girlfriend ‘, one of the highlights of the show and a perfect Rock / Alternative song if their ever was one. Another example of a tune that should be propelling the band beyond Nickleback status but is not. 

Le piece de la resistance. ‘Weightless’. The tune which placed the band on stage for a lifetime. The song that made many people kiss and fall in love. See Spot Run saved it for the end (as most bands would) and upon its uncaging, it proved that music is timeless. A great song is a great song no matter the place, time or era. Brodbeck’s vocals youthful as the the day it was first recorded.

Along the journey of a See Spot Run show, the playfulness shines on. Bowen and Brodbeck miming their way through various antics and adding humorous antedotes along the way. Drummer Fudge singing ‘Wild Thing’ (the one hit wonder by Ton Loc) and upon completion Brodbeck stating ‘ If you came to hear Fudge you can leave now.’ 

See Spot Run show no signs of slowing down. Why should they? It’s not their fault mainstream and radio haven’t caught up. 

Visit See Spot Run Here ! 

*Apologies

 Photos of last night’s show unavailable. 

Rick Keene Music Scene – Rest in Peace Malcolm Young. 

The band was not cutting edge but it was. The band did not invent Rock n Roll but it did. The reason was Malcolm Young.

To coin a well known phrase; ‘ It don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing …’

Look up that explanation in any dictionary and there should be a photo of Malcolm Young beside it. It was AC / DC’s rythym guitarist and co – founder ( along with brother Angus ) Malcolm Young who made three chords stroll .

Starting with the band’s formation in 1973, there have been plenty of hard rock bands that have come and gone. In the form of such predecessors as Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin, it was in England where the boys from Down Under surfaced. Unlike their predecessors , AC DC  were a Blues – based outfit that blended hard rock without the continuation of energy throughout. No catchy riff -turned-into -noise. 

Like a great speaker on a podium , it was Malcolm’s dramatic pauses which elevated the songs to musical heights. Unlike many before and after, those pauses resurfaced throughout the tune and added emotional ebbs to a Rock world filled with mostly flows. The groove filled the heavy metal holes.  

Back in Black , Shoot to Thrill , For Those About To Rock ( We Salute You) plus many other ‘ anthems ‘ the band created until Malcolm’s departure in 2014  stood out.

The spaces were what created the anthem yet it was Malcolm’s ‘swing ‘ as a rythym player that gave life to Angus’ leads. Much like the Rythym section of Watts and Richards in the Stones, Malcolm imported that ‘Jazz’ mentality into the feel of AC DC’s music. Any live stadium or arena show by AC DC on YouTube is proof of that. The crowds , en masse – caught up in the momentum of the moment. Bon Scott’s  (Brian Johnson later ) powerful vocals, Angus’ theatrics and artful solos and Phil Rudd’s relentless pounding all grounded by Malcolm’s sensibilities.  Malcolm’s engine. Malcolm’s songwriting

Malcolm was the brains behind the band on and offstage. The quiet introspective one who watched , learned and played. For Malcolm – it was and it remained until the end; about the music. 

Very few music performers will be laid to rest knowing they wrote and played on twenty odd songs which are played somewhere on Earth everyday. Three hundred and sixty five days a year, somebody is bopping to Thunderstruck, Whole Lotta Rosie and Rock N Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution.  

Habitually , Rock n’ Roll is known as the Devil’s music. Somehow, Malcolm Young was never on the Highway to Hell so his final resting place is in store for something new and not borrowed.

Malcolm Mitchell Young (6 January 1953 – 18 November 2017

Watch The Jack Here 


Lisa Fischer Brings a Smile to Montreal

 The star of 20 Feet to Stardom was twenty feet away. So – it seemed …

The former back-up singer for The Rolling Stones ( just one of many acts Lisa Fischer has enhanced), was at Maison Symphonique in Montreal Saturday night with her band; Grand Baton.

What a band it was …

In a day and age of auto tune and auto – ‘everything else’, Lisa and her mates displayed real sounds in real time. Commencing with a cover of Amy Grant’s ‘ Breath of Heaven’, Lisa’s vocals filled the room with sounds that were otherworldly.

Combining angelic sweetness with Ella – viscosity, Lisa and her band Grand Baton; JC Maillard (guitars, keys), Aidan Carroll (Bass) and Thierry Arpino ( Drums) ,upped the ante in a musical world filled with bluffs.

The trio of musicians adding and subtracting vocals through their instruments. Endorsing Fischer with a mutual admiration and in turn, adorning La Maison Symphonique with golden trinkets. Songs we thought we knew …

‘Rock n Roll’ ( Page, Plant) has been heard millions of times around the world by each Rock fan individually. Multiply that by billions of people, it is one of the most globally popular Rock songs in history. On Saturday night, Lisa and the band made it instantaneously unrecognizable. No small feat. No wrong turns. No stone unturned.

The beauty of a Lisa Fischer / Grand Baton show lays in the telling of stories. Each song such as ‘Rock n Roll’ – explored profoundly. Nuances, melodies, structures, chords and lyrics. Explored in their entirety by the performers before the group hits the stage. Impeccable research and rehearsals take place in order for the songs such as David Bowie’s ‘I’m Afraid of Americans’, Little Willie John’s ‘Fever’  and The Stones’ ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash‘ to shine like Super Novas in a universe filled with falling stars. Each song performed the way they were probably penned before record companies and radio got involved. Before big money got involved.

Each cover retaining moments of ‘face’recognition. A chorus, connotation of a lyric or a riff. The remaining ingredients  – like improvised Jazz with every genre added for the perfect blend. The perfect adventure. The perfect storm.

Rarely does there exist a vocalist whose power is not in need of microphone. A singer who can have the microphone ’20 feet away ‘ and still send shock-waves to the rear of a venue. Reverberating throughout – tickling the souls and toying with the senses. Elvis Presley did it and in 2016 – Lisa Fischer is carrying the vocal  ‘Grand Baton’ around the world.

In music, there are four types of musicians. Fair, good, great and exceptional.

There are also the musicians who have followed the steps and not betrayed their craft. Able, willing and curious to understand where all levels of musicianship comes from. Understanding the principles of the soul through global voyages. The real origins of music are not stationary.

Saturday night, in a day and age of uncertainty in all aspects of life including music, Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton gave Montreal shelter. War – after all, may be just a shot away and Lisa proudly reminded the crowd of the ‘global’ stage from where she came …

A blessed musical education.

 

 Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Caire

See You There !

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Visit The League of Rock Here!

 

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 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

The League of Rock Montreal – Speeding Towards Showcase Number Two on November 16th !

They have come a long way …

 

 It is make or break time. 

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Following a month of rehearsals, The League of Rock Montreal and the four ‘brand spanking new bands’, introduced themselves to the rockin’ world on November 2nd at McKibbons Pointe Claire.

 It was an opportunity for each member of each band to recognize their place in the world of music. There are no room for egos if improvement is on the list as ‘things to do’. Any working entity must place aside personal and technical prowess in order for grooves to take           place. For unity to conquer…

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On Wednesday, Nov. 9th – it was back to basics at Studio Musico Pratik in Verdun. 

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An occasion for ‘tails between legs’ or ‘heads up high’ to convene, reassess and imply the foibles and fables of lore into the next rung on the Rock n Roll ladder. Nuances which may have intervened with success the week before. Battles within an individual, hauntingly placed inside the treasure chest of stalemates in the ultimate game of melodic chess.

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Working together like Bees in a hive, each part of each sum – striving to be heard so a sound so unique, so distinct, will be achieved and mastered.

Gary Johnston, the CEO of The League of Rock Montreal. A bass player with so many experiences within his weathered fingers; coaching – egging his students into an area they thought they knew. A place as foreign as foreigners are to an ancient place. The zone. The temple of  … completeness.

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The eyes of the musicians have changed in the past few weeks. Imagery replaced with concrete. Strawberry Fields nourished by the Salt of the Earth.

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Playing live will do that. The energy gained by both punters and performers as magical and educational as a stint at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

 Confidence gained and confidence lost as musicians learn about themselves, their band-mates and the song. A tune which may be overhauled to match the limit of the music highway. No speeding tickets allowed on the Highway to Hell.

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It’s go time … !

Walking on water is much different than tiptoeing on water lilies. The scenery underwater is beautiful yet the sky seems brighter when the instruments are stuck in the mud. The bottom feeders not as attractive as the pulsating ceiling lights.

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General George S. Patton once forced himself to eat oranges while staring at maggots consuming oranges.

Force feeding courage so the moments of bliss will never be to complacent. Instilling a discipline as profound as the roots of music to a conductor of Jazz. Pain induces fame. Injury to the soul increases stamina. Misery loves the company of a live music crowd.

The lady and men of The League of Rock Montreal have witnessed the other side of the Camel’s hump. They have climbed the hills of uncertainty.

As they slide towards the ravine of their next public appearance, their luggage is lighter. The baggage newer. The vision brighter.  Hard work  pays off with Golden Rings ….

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Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Claire

See You There !

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Visit The League of Rock Here!

 

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 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

The Stones Have The Blues – Part Three. Hear Two New Blues Songs Here!

  Legend has it …

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Robert Johnson sold his soul at The Crossroads to the Devil in exchange for Blues superiority.  As time goes on, it appears someone else sold their souls and the Devil must have gotten a hell of a lot in return.

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The Rolling Stones, created and led by Brian Jones – were originally a Blues Band. Schooled by Johnson, Elmore James, Muddy Waters and a variety of characters from America, the Stones are credited with re-introducing the Blues back from where it came. Mississippi and Chicago. The birthplace and the cradle.

Elvis Presley acted Black and the crowds loved it. The Stones were Black and the crowds have not left after fifty-four years !

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Please listen below to some Blues tracks from the Rolling Stones in advance of their first full Blues album in fifty – four years !

The album, Blue and Lonesome is out in stores on Dec. 2nd

Listen to two new tracks from

The Rolling Stones Here !

 

 

 

Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Claire

See You There !

cropped-logo-e1470902389800.jpg

Visit The League of Rock Here!

unnamed

 

 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

The Stones Have The Blues – Part Two. Parental Guidance Suggested.

  Legend has it …

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Robert Johnson sold his soul at The Crossroads to the Devil in exchange for Blues superiority.  As time goes on, it appears someone else sold their souls and the Devil must have gotten a hell of a lot in return.

th-1

The Rolling Stones, created and led by Brian Jones – were originally a Blues Band. Schooled by Johnson, Elmore James, Muddy Waters and a variety of characters from America, the Stones are credited with re-introducing the Blues back from where it came. Mississippi and Chicago. The birthplace and the cradle.

Elvis Presley acted Black and the crowds loved it. The Stones were Black and the crowds have not left after fifty-four years !

th-4

Please listen below to some Blues tracks from the Rolling Stones in advance of their first full Blues album in fifty – four years !

The album, Blue and Lonesome is out in stores on Dec. 2nd

Stayed tuned for Part Three and hear two new tracks from

The Rolling Stones 

 

 

Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Claire

See You There !

cropped-logo-e1470902389800.jpg

Visit The League of Rock Here!

unnamed

 

 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

The Stones Have The Blues – Part One.

  Legend has it …

th-3

Robert Johnson sold his soul at The Crossroads to the Devil in exchange for Blues superiority.  As time goes on, it appears someone else sold their souls and the Devil must have gotten a hell of a lot in return.

th-1

The Rolling Stones, created and led by Brian Jones – were originally a Blues Band. Schooled by Johnson, Elmore James, Muddy Waters and a variety of characters from America, the Stones are credited with re-introducing the Blues back from where it came. Mississippi and Chicago. The birthplace and the cradle.

Elvis Presley acted Black and the crowds loved it. The Stones were Black and the crowds have not left after fifty-four years !

th-4

Please listen below to some Blues tracks from the Rolling Stones in advance of their first full Blues album in fifty – four years !

The album, Blue and Lonesome is out in stores on Dec. 2nd

Stayed tuned for Part Two and hear two new tracks from

The Rolling Stones 

 

 

Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Claire

See You There !

cropped-logo-e1470902389800.jpg

Visit The League of Rock Here!

unnamed

 

 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

The League of Rock Montreal – The First Showcase? A Huge Success !

          *Welcome to the Grand illusion

Come on in and see what’s happening
Pay the price, get your tickets for the show
The stage is set, the band starts playing
Suddenly your heart is pounding
Wishing secretly you were a star

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The lyrics from Styx’s great song ‘Grand Illusion’ – never rang so true as they did on November 2nd at McKibbon’s Pub in Pte Claire.

The wait was over.  No time left to fiddle with a groove or groove with a fiddle. Following four weeks of rehearsals, the men and woman who signed up for The League of Rock Montreal, dressed up and hit the stage.

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Playing before a live audience for the first time in their current formations, the sets and songs could have gone three ways for the four bands.  Good, bad or somewhere in the middle. Make it four ways. It may have been a complete disaster.

Nerves are a precious entity. They can propel to great heights or defeat all senses and send a person (performance ) into an early grave.

Backstage, pre-show, with the support of their own bandmates, guest coaches bass player Boogie Cindy ( Boogie Wonder Band) and vocalist Carolyn Fe, it was a mixed agenda as nerves and confidence battled for music supremacy. Those with nerves pretending to be confident and vice versa. A war of contradiction as the clock neared the starting gate.

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“But don’t be fooled by the radio
The TV or the magazines
They’ll show you photographs of how your life should be
But they’re just someone else’s fantasies
So if you think your life is complete confusion
‘Cause you never win the game
Just remember that it’s a grand illusion
And deep inside we’re all the same
We’re all the same”

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“So if you think your life is complete confusion
Because your neighbor’s got it made
Just remember that it’s a grand illusion
And deep inside we’re all the same”

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“America spells competition
Join us in our blind ambition
Get yourself a brand new motorcar
Someday soon we’ll stop to ponder
What on earth’s this spell we’re under
We made the grade and still we wonder
Who the hell we are …”

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**Well, woke up this morning with a wine glass in my hand
Whose wine? What wine?
Where the hell did I dine?
Must have been a dream
I don’t believe where I’ve been
Come on, let’s do it again

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Do you…you, feel like I do?
How’d ya feel?
Do you…you, feel like I do?

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My friend got busted
Just the other day
They said,”Don’t walk, don’t walk, don’t walk away.”
Drove him to a taxi
Bent the boot, hit the back
Had to play some music, otherwise he’d crack

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Do you…you, feel like I do?
How’d ya feel?
Do you…you, feel like I…

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Do you…you, feel like I do?
Yes ya do
Do you…you, feel like I do?

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Champagne for breakfast and a Sherman in my hand
Peach coat, Peach tails., never fails
Must have been a dream I don’t believe where I’ve been
Come on, let’s do it again

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Do you…you, feel like I do?
How’d ya feel?
Do you…you, feel like I…

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Do you feel like we do?
Do you feel like we do?
Oh, that’s true
Do you feel like we do?
Get back
Do you feel..do you feel like we do?

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Oh baby do you feel?
Oh baby do you feel, feel like we do?
Do you feel…do you feel…like we do?
I want to thank you
Do you feel like we do?
That’s alright, that’s alright to feel you’d like
Feel you’d like, a good time
We’ll goto bed for a good night
Good night, good night, good night, good night, good night

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Next Showcase for The League of Rock Montreal is

Wed. November 16th at

Calistoga Grill Pte Claire

See You There !

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*Lyrics Dennis DeYoung

**Lyrics Peter Frampton

 

Visit The League of Rock Here!

 

 Visit Evenko Here !

 

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

Cliff Stevens – Explaining Why ” Grass Won’t Grow’ !

 In Montreal – Cliff Stevens is known as ‘ Slowhand ‘. 

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Something that came as a surprise to Stevens at one point in his musical life.

” I loved Clapton and loved playing his music.” Says Cliff from his ‘home away from home’ Morocco. “Everywhere I played or went, people kept telling me I sounded like Clapton and looked like him too. It took me a while but I caught on and starting doing a tribute to him!’ He laughs.

For those who know Cliff, guitar playing and music is at the top of his priorities. A craft he works very hard at and the results are in full glossy form musically and personally on his second album; ‘Grass Won’t Grow’. A disc which combines elements of one of Clapton’s favorite songwriters – J.J. Cale.

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Cale

” Writing the songs, I did not conscientiously think of Cale but there is definitely that influence in there.” Admits Cliff.  “Cale was so influential on Clapton’s career with songs like ‘Cocaine’,  my affection of Clapton’s music is an extension of Cale.”

‘Grass Won’t Grow’  is a record which Stevens is extremely fond of and the album has hard work combined with personal lyrics. In short, an accumulation of Steven’s life so far. Any artist whose passion for music leads them into romantic troubles will identify immediately with the album’s theme and the album’s second song ‘Price You Pay’

” It’s my life …” chuckles Cliff. ” I’ve had a few relationships over the years which don’t work out because of my lifestyle as a working musician. It isn’t easy being on the road and committing to a union of two people. The end of some were my fault and some were because of my unwillingness to ‘stay home’ The lyrics are all about my feelings, thoughts and emotions.”

Stevens’ ‘unwillingness ‘ to stay home is somewhat  reflective of the live music scene in Montreal. Something which has sadly diminished in the past few years.

” Doing my music or the Clapton tribute, the scene in Montreal was not enough to make a living.” Explains Cliff.

” There are places I play and continually get work when I am Montreal  but it is just not enough to pay the bills. I have come to Morocco for a few years now and it is a great place for travelling musicians. My  expenses  are small in Morocco  and there is enough work to keep coming back.”

‘Grass Won’t Grow’ is a love affair for Stevens with a combination of Blues, Country and a small dose of Rock n Roll. Catchy choruses and clever riffs enhance Stevens’ solos with a genuine feeling of togetherness. A feeling Stevens contributes to the musicians playing on the album.

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” I could not have done it without them” Admits Cliff.” I was so lucky these guys had time to help me out. ”

Stevens explains.

“Sam Harrisson ( Paul Deslauriers Band)  is on drums,  Alec McElcheran (one of Montreal’s most sought after session players) is on Bass and Eric Sauve adds Piano and Organ. The professionalism and experience these guys added were unbelievable. Their advice on arrangements – just enough to make the songs work that much better. It sounds clichéd but I really don’t think it ( the album) would have that continuous feel without them. Simon ( Jodoin) and Marc ( Theriault) engineered and mastered the album and without them, none of us are very good …”

‘Grass Won’t Grow’ opens with an easy-going flare. Unlike some ‘Blues’ albums, there is nothing repetitive to the senses. 

‘The track that seems to be getting a lot of airplay is ‘Runnin’.” Explains Stevens.  “It is more Rock and Pop than the others and it surprised me a bit. I’m just happy people like it. Of course – there is a Blues foundation within the song which most Rock n Roll has. “

“Don’t You Say’ – the opening track and the second tune ‘Price You Pay’, both contain a Stevie Ray Vaughn ‘Coldshot ‘ kinda feel. A tune custom-made for having a drink after a hard day’s work. The theme of a disenchanted female, absorbed by Stevens’ relaxing riffs and raspy vocals. Company for the misunderstood musician.

The’pearl’ of the album, a song which everyone should be singing along to once the chorus is embedded in their earphones is the title track; ‘Grass won’t Grow’. An infectious upbeat number destined for a movie soundtrack. A feel good upbeat number which, at the very least – leaves the listener humming all day.

‘Cryin’ My Heart Out’  is the aw shucks tune. The song which lyrically would make any woman forgive Cliff. With a touch of an eighties  Colin James , the song remains distinctively Stevens. Something about the voice on this song and the album which arrives as pure and unadulterated. The powerful lead in by the band and more powerful solo is a must listen for any fan of the Blues ballad.

‘All Through the Night’ , should have been on The Beatles’ Abbey road album. A dark feel grounded by menacing riffs and an eerie solo. Blood curling stuff which grabs by the guitar neck and chokes you into the Blues-y Rock feeling of  early seventies  California. Spine – chillin’.

Please listen below to sample some of the songs on

‘Grass Won’t Grow’. 

 

Visit Cliff Here !

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Visit The League of Rock Here!

 Visit Evenko Here !

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

 

 

Delfeayo Marsalis – Making America Great Again ! Part Three.

 Delfeayo Marsalis comes from Jazz royalty.

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The Marsalis clan are considered to be building blocks and messengers for the great tradition of New Orleans music. Carrying the torch and integrity of  great American Jazz.

Delfeayo Marsalis, perhaps more than his brothers Wynton and Branford, or – in a different way, is educating  the folks in real time. Adorning the American landscape with words and music, profound in history and poignant at a time when America is wounded.

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Please listen below to part three of my chat as Delfeayo explains Jazz in New Orleans and the message of pure spiritual sounds which are integral to the past and future of great music in America and around the world.

Delfeayo? What’s Up?

 

 

Visit Delfeayo Here !

 

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Visit The League of Rock Here!

 Visit Evenko Here !

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

Visit Cliff Here !
Visit Cliff Here !

 

 

The League of Rock Montreal – Showcasing One Month of Hard Work !

 

Well – to coin the name of a recent video title, this is it …

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The League of Rock Montreal, following four weeks of rehearsals, is showcasing the results on November 2nd at McKibbons West Island.

The first step towards the bands recording their songs on to CD at a professional studio in Showcase Number One. 

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It has been an interesting journey thus far. All these musical men and woman meeting for the first time a month ago. Drummers, singers, bass players, guitar players and a keyboardist. Each with specific styles. Each with different tastes in music. Each with one goal. To learn, grow and become better musicians.

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On November 2nd, the results will be known to each performer. They will discover, how much they have improved and – how much they have not. So far, they have been practicing in a studio with their backs to where the audience will be on Tuesday. On the second day in November, they’ll be performing on stage. A different animal. A completely different ‘tune’.

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Thankfully, the groups have had some help along the way.

Montreal chapter president Gary Johnston has not only ‘ barked’ instructions to the would be ‘rock stars’ , he has also recruited some very knowledgeable musicians to encourage and teach the League of Rock bands.

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In order, Brian Greenway ( April Wine), Corey Diabo ( Jonas and The Massive Attraction), Warwick artist Simon Daigle and Roy Nichol (April Wine) have ‘lent’ their experience to the aspiring musicians.

Last Wednesday, Roy Nichol ( above picture) was very instrumental in shaping a somewhat anxious bunch of previous ‘clay’ into magnificent sculptures of Rock.

The current April Wine drummer – explaining things that only an experienced musician could. Initiating talks on how a successful band operates. Something not known to the ‘naked ear’.  After all, most fans of any type of music, show up and enjoy the show. Not much thought is put into the behind-the-scenes work and discipline required to make a functioning band function.

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The interesting thing about the four bands participating in The League of Rock Montreal is the short period of time they had to choose three songs and tighten them into form.

Remember, not everyone in each band may like a song choice. Not everyone in each band knew the chosen song  a month ago. This is where the League of Rock coaches helped.

Nichol, last week, explaining to a vocalist, not to ‘read the words’. Explaining how the vocalist rides the foundation of a song which is led by a drummer ( usually) . Trusting the musicians and learning to ride the wave.

Once the bands became aware that even experienced musicians must shove trepidation to the side, it facilitated the process for The League of Rock bands and aided in the transformation  of creating a full sound . A tight sound. A cohesive sound. A unit …

The League of Rock coaches ease the nerves. The League of Rock coaches simplify things.

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Brian Greenway

Wednesday Nov. 2nd at McKibbons Pointe Claire will be a test. A test of nerves, an exam of technique and a result to head back to the studio with to work on. New knowledge to return to the studio and  tamper and fiddle with anything or everything that went wrong.

Step one to becoming a working band. 

Visit The League of Rock Here!

Visit McKibbons Here !

 

 Visit Evenko Here

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

Visit Cliff Here !
Visit Cliff Here !

 

 

Delfeayo Marsalis – Making America Great Again ! Part Two.

 Delfeayo Marsalis comes from Jazz royalty.

th-16

The Marsalis clan are considered to be building blocks and messengers for the great tradition of New Orleans music. Carrying the torch and integrity of  great American Jazz.

Delfeayo Marsalis, perhaps more than his brothers Wynton and Branford, or – in a different way, is educating  the folks in real time. Adorning the American landscape with words and music, profound in history and poignant at a time when America is wounded.

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Please listen below to part two of my chat as Delfeayo explains Jazz in New Orleans and the message of pure spiritual sounds which are integral to the past and future of great music in America and around the world.

Delfeayo? What’s Up?

 

 

Stay Tuned for Part Three !

Visit Delfeayo Here !

 

cropped-logo-e1470902389800.jpg

 

Visit The League of Rock Here!

 Visit Evenko Here !

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

Visit Cliff Here !
Visit Cliff Here !

 

 

Delfeayo Marsalis – Making America Great Again ! Part One.

 Delfeayo Marsalis comes from Jazz royalty.

th-16

The Marsalis clan are considered to be building blocks and messengers for the great tradition of New Orleans music. Carrying the torch and integrity of  great American Jazz.

Delfeayo Marsalis, perhaps more than his brothers Wynton and Branford, or – in a different way, is educating  the folks in real time. Adorning the American landscape with words and music, profound in history and poignant at a time when America is wounded.

th-15

Please listen below to part one of my chat as Delfeayo explains Jazz in New Orleans and the message of pure spiritual sounds which are integral to the past and future of great music in America and around the world.

Delfeayo? What’s Up?

 

Stay Tuned for Part Two !

Visit Delfeayo Here !

 

cropped-logo-e1470902389800.jpg

 

Visit The League of Rock Here!

 Visit Evenko Here !

Visit The Hi – Fins Here !

Visit Cliff Here !
Visit Cliff Here !